Hard-boiled brain vomit

femmebotnoir:

thesimpsonswayoflife:

Ralph Appreciation Post - Part I

I can’t stop laughing at the “I’m a dog one.”  Why?  Ohmygod.  That’s hilarious.

barafurbear:

anotheralexandros:

tommytv:

nychealth:

Let’s stop HIV in New York City

  • If you are HIV-negative, PEP and PrEP can help you stay that way.
  • If you are HIV-positive, PEP and PrEP can help protect your partners.

 

Daily PrEP

PrEP is a daily pill that can help keep you HIV-negative as long as you take it every day.

  • Ask your doctor if PrEP (Pre-exposure Prophylaxis) may be right for you.
  • Condoms give you additional protection against HIV, other sexually transmitted infections, and unintended pregnancy.

 

Emergency PEP

If you are HIV-negative and think you were exposed to HIV, immediately go to a clinic or emergency room and ask for PEP (Post-exposure  Prophylaxis).

  • PEP can stop HIV if started within 36 hours of exposure.
  • You continue taking PEP for 28 days.

Many insurance plans including Medicaid cover PEP and PrEP. Assistance may be available if you are uninsured. Visit NYC Health’s website to find out where to get PrEP or PEP in New York City.

This is such a giant step that barely any people know about it seems, so amazing to see progress in the treatment of HIV

I honestly thought this might be exaggeration but the CDC says that PrEP is 92% effective. Damn. Damn.

reblogging because this deserves waaaay more attention D:

we-arethewildthings:

Thank you so much, John Oliver.

Boom.

Ich liebe dich, Bendis!
Anonymous

brianmichaelbendis:

I know this is a completely inappropriate response to your lovely comment but I’ve been sitting on this pic for over a year and it’s the closest I’ve ever come to being able to use it ( without being a total  ass :) )

universalequalityisinevitable:

David Suzuki in this interview about facing the reality of climate change and other environmental issues from Moyers & Company.

saaga:

Benedict Cumberbatch accepts his GQ award aka the best award speech 
he has done [x]

Terrific.

I’ll never punish my daughter for saying no.

The first time it comes out of her mouth, I’ll smile gleefully. As she repeats “No! No! No!” I’ll laugh, overjoyed. At a young age, she’ll have mastered a wonderful skill. A skill I’m still trying to learn. I know I’ll have to teach her that she has to eat her vegetables, and she has to take a nap. But “No” is not wrong. It is not disobedience.

1. She will know her feelings are valid.
2. She will know that when I no longer guide her, she still has a right to refuse.

The first time a boy pulls her hair after she says no, and the teacher tells her “boys will be boys,” we will go to her together, and explain that my daughter’s body is not a public amenity. That boy isn’t teasing her because he likes her, he is harassing her because it is allowed. I will not reinforce that opinion. If my son can understand that “no means no” so can everyone else’s.

3. She owes no one her silence, her time, or her cooperation.

The first time she tells a teacher, “No, that is wrong,” and proceeds to correct his public school, biased rhetoric, I’ll revel in the fact that she knows her history; that she knows our history. The first time she tells me “No” with the purpose and authority that each adult is entitled, I will stop. I will apologize. I will listen.

4. She is entitled to her feelings and her space. I, even as a parent, have no right to violate them.
5. No one has a right to violate them.

The first time my mother questions why I won’t make her kiss my great aunt at Christmas, I’ll explain that her space isn’t mine to control. That she gains nothing but self doubt when she is forced into unwanted affection. I’ll explain that “no” is a complete sentence. When the rest of my family questions why she is not made to wear a dress to our reunion dinner. I will explain that her expression is her own. It provides no growth to force her into unnecessary and unwanted situation.

6. She is entitled to her expression.

When my daughter leaves my home, and learns that the world is not as open, caring, and supportive as her mother, she will be prepared. She will know that she can return if she wishes, that the real world can wait. She will not want to. She will not need to. I will have prepared her, as much as I can, for a world that will try to push her down at every turn.

7. She is her own person. She is complete as she is.

I will never punish my daughter for saying no. I want “No” to be a familiar friend. I never want her to feel that she cannot say it. She will know how to call on “No” whenever it is needed, or wanted.

Lessons I Will Teach, Because the World Will Not — Y.S. (via poetryinspiredbyyou)

I fucking love Donald.

youngjusticer:

What will live on forever is the sheer joy the sight of his smiling face brought. An evening at the movies with this man, even in his most formulaic “dramedies,” will always mean a psychic cleansing for the millions who love him. A receiving of this guy’s gift of healing through laughter transports us to where we can indulge a return to our most childlike happiness. Rest easy, Robin Williams.
Tribute to Robin Williams, by Nicholas Chapuis.

youngjusticer:

What will live on forever is the sheer joy the sight of his smiling face brought. An evening at the movies with this man, even in his most formulaic “dramedies,” will always mean a psychic cleansing for the millions who love him. A receiving of this guy’s gift of healing through laughter transports us to where we can indulge a return to our most childlike happiness. Rest easy, Robin Williams.

Tribute to Robin Williams, by Nicholas Chapuis.